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British Railway Steam Locomotive

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Please read this statement on the accuracy of the data shown below

Note: To Obtain Consistency in the Steam System, Shed Codes used are those Registered at Nationalisation on 1st January 1948
Number 9303 b
2nd Grouping Number
1st Grouping Numbergwr 9303
2nd Pre Grouping Number
1st Pre Grouping Number
Works/Lot Number
Class Code4300
DesignerChurchward
Designation2-6-0
Built29/02/1932
BuilderSwindon Works (GWR/British Railways)
1948 Shed81D Reading
Last Shed86G Pontypool Road
Withdrawn30/04/1964
Disposal detailsSee Notes Below
DisposalPreserved

Class Information

Introduced 1911. Churchward GWR design.
(a) Introduced 1925. With detail alterations affecting weight.
(b) Introduced 1932. With side-window cabs and detail alterations. Renumbered into 73XX series 1956-59 after further detail alterations to reduce weight.
Some temp. converted to oil burning in 1947 - all reconverted back to coal.

Weight:
Loco 62 tons 0 cwt Driving Wheel: 5' 8"
64 tons 0 cwt (a)
65 tons 6 cwt (b)
Tend 40 tons 0 cwt Boil Press: 200lb/sq in Su
Cylinders: Valve Gear: Stephenson (piston valves)
Two 18?" x 30" (outside) TE: 25,670 lb

Images

BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 at Woodhams Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 02/09/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 1595
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 (built as No. 9303) at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Swindon Works in February 1932, it was withdrawn from 86G Pontypool Road shed in April 1964 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It is preserved at the Severn Valley Railway on static display. A future overhaul is possible with return to its original condition. 9303 is one of the final batch of 342 locomotives built between 1911 and 1932. They were built with larger cabs and had a weight attached to the buffer beam to place more weight on the leading pony wheels. This was done to reduce the wear on the leading driving wheels. In 1958 the weight was removed from the buffer beam to give the locomotive more route availability. At the same time it was renumbered 7325. The plan is to replace the missing weight at the next overhaul so it can run as 9303.

The class was introduced in 1911 to a G.J. Churchward design. 342 were built until 1932. They were initially numbered in the 4300-99, 5300-99, 6300 - 6399 and 7300 - 7321 ranges. The 4300 Moguls were the maids of all work on the GWR network and later the Western Region of British Railways. Employing a Standard number 4 boiler and the support struts similar to those fitted to the '2800' class, the class very quickly earned an excellent reputation in its ability to handle most types of traffic, from local stopping goods to main line expresses.

After the first twenty locomotives were built, the frames of subsequent engines were lengthened by 9 inches at the rear to give better access for maintenance as well as providing more room in the cab. Of the class 88 were withdrawn in the 1930s, and the wheels and motion of 80 were used for the Grange Class and 8 for Manor Class engines. The advent of the Second World War in 1939 brought a halt to the conversions. 5322 preserved in WWI Railway Operating Division khaki livery

Eleven examples of the class were transported to France during World War I in the service of the Railway Operating Division of the British Army and these were 5319 - 5326 and 5328 - 5330. One of these survives in preservation. Of the 342 engines built only two have been preserved.


BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 at Woodhams Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 12/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 3254
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 (built as No. 9303) at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Swindon Works in February 1932, it was withdrawn from 86G Pontypool Road shed in April 1964 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It is preserved at the Severn Valley Railway on static display. A future overhaul is possible with return to its original condition. 9303 is one of the final batch of 342 locomotives built between 1911 and 1932. They were built with larger cabs and had a weight attached to the buffer beam to place more weight on the leading pony wheels. This was done to reduce the wear on the leading driving wheels. In 1958 the weight was removed from the buffer beam to give the locomotive more route availability. At the same time it was renumbered 7325. The plan is to replace the missing weight at the next overhaul so it can run as 9303.

The class was introduced in 1911 to a G.J. Churchward design. 342 were built until 1932. They were initially numbered in the 4300-99, 5300-99, 6300 - 6399 and 7300 - 7321 ranges. The 4300 Moguls were the maids of all work on the GWR network and later the Western Region of British Railways. Employing a Standard number 4 boiler and the support struts similar to those fitted to the '2800' class, the class very quickly earned an excellent reputation in its ability to handle most types of traffic, from local stopping goods to main line expresses.

After the first twenty locomotives were built, the frames of subsequent engines were lengthened by 9 inches at the rear to give better access for maintenance as well as providing more room in the cab. Of the class 88 were withdrawn in the 1930s, and the wheels and motion of 80 were used for the Grange Class and 8 for Manor Class engines. The advent of the Second World War in 1939 brought a halt to the conversions. 5322 preserved in WWI Railway Operating Division khaki livery

Eleven examples of the class were transported to France during World War I in the service of the Railway Operating Division of the British Army and these were 5319 - 5326 and 5328 - 5330. One of these survives in preservation. Of the 342 engines built only two have been preserved.

A schoolboy trainspotter in his school uniform of peaked school cap, shirt, tie, short trousers and knee socks, poses in front of the loco. By 1966, school caps and shorts were no longer worn by the vast majority of boys, only public and grammar schools hanging on to them.


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Last Updated : 18/08/1966

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