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Thu 27 Apr 2017 21:47:08


 
 

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Station Name

Darlington Bank Top

Railway Company


Images

Brush Type 4 Class 47 No. D1579 (47459) at Darlington Bank Top Station 1965

Image Date: 18/04/1965
Image Owner: Howie Milburn


A pensive looking trainspotter schoolboy wearing his school uniform, poses as his photo is taken by the cab of a diesel loco at Darlington Bank Top Station on Easter Sunday 18th April 1965. He wears a peaked school cap, shirt, tie, pullover, blazer (with a notebook in the pocket) and short trousers. The loco, Brush Type 4 Class 47 No. D1579, was later to be renumbered as Class 47/4 47459, built at Crewe works in May 1964, withdrawn 25th March 1992 and scrapped at Booth-Roe Metals, Rotherham 7th May 1993. Although being slowly phased out, shorts and caps were items of school uniform common at this time.


Stephenson 0-4-0 Locomotion No. 1 at Darlington Bank Top Station 1965

Image Date: 18/04/1965
Image Owner: Howie Milburn


A schoolboy trainspotter in his anorak and school uniform of peaked school cap, shirt, tie, pullover, blazer, short trousers and knee socks, poses for a photo in front of "Locomotion No. 1" at Darlington Bank Top station on Easter Sunday 18th April 1965. "Locomotion" was constructed at the Forth Banks, Newcastle works of Robert Stephenson & Co. A total of four locomotives were built at a price of £600 each. The world famous engine "Locomotion No. 1" which was originally called Active, hauled the first train on the opening day of the Stockton and Darlington Railway on September 27th 1825, it remained in use until 1841. It was presented to the railway company in 1857 for permanent preservation and was placed on a pedestal in front of North Road station at Darlington. It was later moved to Darlington's Bank Top station (1892) and returned to North Road Station in 1975 with the opening of Darlington Railway Museum (now Head of Steam). Although being slowly phased out, shorts and caps were items of school uniform common at this time.


Stephenson 0-4-0 Locomotion No. 1 at Darlington Station 1963

Image Date: 21/07/1963
Image Owner: Howie Milburn


Locomotion No. 1 (originally named Active) 0-4-0, on a plinth at Darlington North Road Works on Sunday 21st July 1963. It was an early British steam locomotive built for the Stockton and Darlington Railway. Built by George and Robert Stephenson's company Robert Stephenson and Company in 1825. It was the first one to run on a passenger carrying line. In 1857 it was preserved. Locomotion No. 1 was on display in Alfred Kitching's workshop near Hopetown Carriage Works from 1857 to the 1880s. From 1892 to 1975 it was on display along with Derwent on one of the platforms at Darlington's main station, Bank Top. The locomotive is now on display at the Darlington Railway Centre and Museum, located in the same building as Darlington's North Road station, on long-term loan from the National Railway Museum. It is now part of the National Collection. There is a working replica of the locomotive at Beamish Museum.


Hackworth/Kitchin 0-6-0 No. 25 Derwent at Darlington Station 1963

Image Date: 21/07/1963
Image Owner: Howie Milburn


No. 25 Derwent 0-6-0 on a plinth at Darlington North Road Works on Sunday 21st July 1963. Derwent is an 0-6-0 steam locomotive built in 1845 by William and Alfred Kitching for the Stockton and Darlington Railway (S&DR). It was designed by Timothy Hackworth and built by W. & A. Kitching in Darlington, England in 1845. It is similar in design to two of their 1842 locomotives, Leader and Trader, with outside cylinders fixed at the trailing end of the boiler and four feet diameter, six-wheeled coupled wheels. Withdrawn from service in 1869, it was sold to Pease & Partners for use on their colliery lines and spent some time at the construction of the Waskerley reservoir. It took part in the Stephenson Centenary celebrations at Newcastle in 1881 and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee in 1887. Derwent was presented to the North Eastern Railway (NER) in 1898 for preservation. After restoration the locomotive ran under its own steam in the 1925 Railway Centenary procession and on trials the day before the procession, achieved a speed of 12 m.p.h. Otherwise for many years it was on display alongside Locomotion No 1 on a plinth on one of the platforms at Darlington's main station, Bank Top. In the 1960s it was removed and restored in near original condition, and then moved in the 1970s to the Darlington Railway Centre and Museum located in the same building as Darlington's North Road railway station, where it remains on display on long-term loan from the National Railway Museum. It is now part of the National Collection.


BR/LNER Gresley Class A3 4-6-2 No. 60074 at Darlington Station C.1961

Image Date: c1961
Image Owner: ebay


BR/LNER Gresley Class A3 4-6-2 Pacific No. 60074 'Harvester' at Darlington Bank Top Station with The Queen of Scots Pullman circa 1961. Built by the North British Locomotive Company, Glasgow and released to traffic on 8 October 1924 as Class A1, it was rebuilt to Class A3 in April 1928. It was withdrawn from 55H 50B Leeds Neville Hill shed on 8 April 1963 and cut up at Doncaster Works 29 May 1963. The new Pacific locomotives were built at the Doncaster 'Plant' in 1922 to the design of Nigel Gresley, who had become Chief Mechanical Engineer of the GNR in 1911. The intention was to produce an engine able to handle, without assistance, mainline express services that were reaching the limits of the capacity of the Ivatt large-boilered Atlantics. The London and North Eastern Railway LNER Gresley Classes A1 and A3 locomotives represented two distinct stages in the history of the British 4-6-2 'Pacific' steam locomotives designed by Nigel Gresley. They were designed for main line passenger services, initially on the Great Northern Railway (GNR), a constituent company of the London and North Eastern Railway after the amalgamation of 1923, for which they became a standard design. The change in class designation to A3 reflected the fitting to the same chassis of a higher pressure boiler with a greater superheating surface and a small reduction in cylinder diameter, leading to an increase in locomotive weight. Eventually all of the A1 locomotives were rebuilt to A3 specifications. The names for the locomotives came from a variety of sources. The first, Great Northern, was named after its parent company. Others were given the names of high-ranking railway officials, but most were given the names of famous racehorses. One was named after the company's most famous long-distance passenger train, the Flying Scotsman. Flying Scotsman is the sole survivor of the class to be preserved. It is currently under mechanical overhaul at the National Railway Museum. A group of young trainspotters in their school uniforms of caps, blazers and short trousers huddle together looking at the locos cab.


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